10-Minute Declutter: The Stress-Free Habit for Simplifying Your Home

10-Minute Declutter” is for anyone who is tired of being surrounded by items they don’t need and wants to regain control of their living environment.

As the Dalai Lama reminds us, “Simplicity is extremely important for happiness. Having few desires, feeling satisfied with what you have, is very vital: satisfaction with just enough food, clothing, and shelter to protect yourself from the elements.

Clutter is often a reflection of our inner selves. If we feel disorganized, out of sorts, depressed, stressed out or insecure, it shows up in the way we manage our daily lives.

Decluttering gives you renewed energy, inner peace and more “mental space” to enjoy the meaningful, joyful aspects of your life. Clutter is often a reflection of our inner selves. If we feel disorganized, out of sorts, depressed, stressed out or insecure, it shows up in the way we manage our daily lives.

Eaglesaver is a simple way to eliminate the entertainment items you no longer need.

experiential purchases bring people far more happiness and life satisfaction than material purchases. It’s how we spend our time that makes us happy, not what we own. As

Here are fifteen types of questions you should ask: 1. Is this item useful? Can it save me time, energy or money? Does it fulfill a need or purpose? If not, let it go. 2. Do I like it? If not, let it go. 3. Does it make my life easier in some way? If not, let it go. 4. Have I worn it, used it, found pleasure in it or looked at it in the last year? If not, let it go. 5. Does it energize me or drain me? If it drains you, let it go. 6. Is it broken beyond repair or damaged in some way? If so, let it go. 7. Is the information it provides outdated (e.g., old books, magazines, videos, etc.)? If so, let it go. 8. Am I holding on to it out of guilt? If so, let it go. 9. Have I finished using it and see no reason to use it again? If so, let it go. 10. Does it reflect the person I am today or a past version of me? If it reflects the past, let it go. 11. Do I already own something similar? If so, let it go. 12. Will I complete this (e.g., a knitting project, an unfinished book)? If not, let it go. 13. Am I spending too much time weighing the pros and cons? If so, let it go. 14. If I had to downsize to a much smaller house, would this go with me? If not, let it go. 15. Does this have any historical or potential financial value (e.g., an item passed down for several generations)? If not, let it go.

If you are looking for a fresh start and want to make big changes in your life, then decluttering is the way to go.

If you have a desire to live in an organized, simplified home, you’ve come to the right place. Throughout 10-Minute Declutter, not only will you learn the skills you need to organize your home, you’ll also discover an actionable strategy to implement immediately.

Introduction For many folks, the kitchen is the catchall room for every item that enters the house. Mail and keys wind up on the counters, school books are scattered on the kitchen table, coats and sweaters are slung on the backs of chairs and the bowl of pet food always gets kicked over as you’re rushing around preparing a meal. In many ways, the kitchen is more like the family room than any other room in the house. Wouldn’t it feel amazing to have not only a sparkling-clean kitchen, but also one that’s streamlined, tidy and organized? We feel that the kitchen is the best place to begin a decluttering project because it sets the stage for how you want the rest of your house to appear. Now, some organizing experts will suggest you begin by clearing your counters first, which works well if you plan to tackle your kitchen in one decluttering event. But for this project, when you’re working in 10-minute increments, you’ll need to create space in cabinets, closets or drawers for those items you no longer want on the counter. For instance, Barrie has found beginning with the lower cabinets often frees up space for some of those countertop appliances. Here’s a suggested plan for tackling your kitchen: • Begin with the lower cabinets, moving left to right around the room. • Move to the upper cabinets, following the same pattern. • Move to the kitchen drawers, starting with the drawers used most often. • Now with more space above and below, clear the countertops. • Clean out and organize the refrigerator.

Many people are obsessed with the idea that everything has to be perfect or immediately accessible, so it’s easy to fall in the trap of trying to buy possessions that will cover every possible situation that might arise. There

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” It you’re not using it, release it graciously to someone else—and make some money at the same time.

Our culture reinforces accumulation, spending on luxury items and focusing too much time on material things instead of experiences and relationships.

Our culture reinforces accumulation, spending on luxury items and focusing too much time on material things instead of experiences and relationships. We’ve been taught the false narrative that more stuff equals greater happiness.

The more you have, the more you are occupied. The less you have, the more free you are.”—Mother

The more you have, the more you are occupied. The less you have, the more free you are.”—Mother Teresa

There is a concept called ego depletion, which is “a person’s diminished capacity to regulate their thoughts, feelings and actions.” Ego depletion impacts our ability to form new habits because our supply of willpower is spread out among all the areas of our lives. Because of this, it’s important to work on only one habit at a time. That way, your store of willpower can be channeled into building that one habit, increasing the odds of success.

The solution is to allow a limited amount of space for sentimental items, such as a single display shelf or limited wall space to display your favorite collectibles. If you want to keep something, there needs to be a designated spot for it. This makes it easier to evaluate the importance of every possession.

We’re going to avoid a long discussion about how our consumerist society is hurting the planet, but it is important to do little things that decrease your carbon footprint. When you have an organized home, you consume less, and when you consume less, you create less trash. When you create less trash, you’re making smart decisions for the environment. #4.

When you organize and eliminate clutter, you free yourself from stress and anxiety by eliminating feelings of overwhelm.