Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (Peter Pan #1)

Ah, Peter, we who have made the great mistake, how differently we should all act at the second chance. But Solomon was right; there is no second chance, not for most of us. When we reach the window it is lock-out time. The iron bars are up for life.

David tells me that fairies never say 'We feel happy': what they say is, 'We feel dancey'.

For otherwise he would have lost faith in his power to fly, and
the moment you doubt whether you can fly, you cease for ever to be able to do it.

he decided to appeal to the fairies for enlightenment. They are reputed
to know a good deal.

He was a poet; and they are never exactly grown-up.

I can give you the power to fly to her house," the Queen said, "but I can't open the door for you.

It is frightfully difficult to know much about the fairies, and almost the only thing for certain is that there are fairies wherever there are children.

It is glorious fun racing down the Hump, but you can't do it on windy days because then you are not there, but the fallen leaves do it instead of you. There is almost nothing that has such a keen sense of fun as a fallen leaf.

Nosotros también hemos estado allí y aún recordamos el murmullo de las olas, aunque no volveremos a desembarcar jamás.

Peter became very clever at helping the birds to build their nests; soon he could build better than a wood-pigeon, and nearly as well as a blackbird, though never did he satisfy the finches, and he made nice little water-troughs near the nests and dug up worms for the young ones with his fingers. He also became very learned in bird-lore, and knew an east wind from a west wind by its smell, and he could see the grass growing and hear the insects walking about inside the tree-trunks.

The door', replied Maimie, 'will always, always be open, and mother will always be waiting at it for me.

The fairies, as their custom, clapped their hands with delight over their cleverness, and they were so madly in love with the little house that they could not bear to think they had finished it.

There is almost nothing that has such a keen sense of fun as a fallen leaf.

Thus, when you cry out, 'Greedy! Greedy!' to the bird that flies
away with the big crust, you know now that you ought not to do this, for he is very likely taking it to Peter
Pan.

We were having another look among the bushes for David's lost worsted ball, and instead of the ball we found a lovely nest made of the worsted, and containing four eggs, with scratches on them very like David's handwriting, so we think they must have been the mother's love-letters to the little ones inside.

What is afraid?' asked Peter longingly. He thought it must be some splendid thing. 'I do wish you would teach me how to be afraid, Maimie,' he said.

You expected too much of me’ I told him, and he bowed his head. ‘I don’t know where you brought your grand ideas of men and women from. I don’t want to know’ I added hastily. But I must have been a prettier word that this’ I said: ‘are you quite sure that you were wise in leaving it?

You will be a Betwixt-and-Between,