The Horse and His Boy (The Chronicles of Narnia (Publication Order) #5)

And certainly both Horses were doing, if not all they could, all they thought they could; which is not quite the same thing.

And I was the Lion you do not remember who pushed the boat in which you lay, a child near death, so that it came to shore where a man sat, wakeful at midnight, to receive you.

Aravis also had many quarrels (and, I'm afraid even fights) with Cor, but they always made it up again: so that years later, when they were grown up they were so used to quarreling and making it up again that they got married so as to go on doing it more conveniently.

But as long as you know you're nobody special, you'll be a very decent sort of Horse, on the whole, and taking one thing with another.

But one of the worst results of being a slave and being forced to do things is that when there is no one to force you any more you find you have almost lost the power of forcing yourself.

Child,' said the Lion, 'I am telling you your story, not hers. No one is told any story but their own.

Come, live with me and you'll know me.

Dearest Daughter. I knew you would not be long in coming to me. Joy shall be yours.

Do not by any means destroy yourself, for if you live you may yet have good fortune, but all the dead are dead like.

Do not dare not to dare.

Father! Can I box him? Please!

Here. All of you. And you, doorkeeper. No one is to be let out of the house today. And anyone I catch talking about this young lady will be first beaten to death and then burned alive and after that be kept on bread and water for six weeks. There.

I don't want him to live forever, and I know that he's not going to live forever whether I want him to or not.

if you do one good deed your reward usually is to be set to do another and harder and better one.

In other words," it continued, "you can't ride. That's a drawback. I'll have to teach you as we go along. If you can't ride, can you fall?"
"I suppose anyone can fall," said Shasta.
"I mean can you fall and get up again without crying and mount again and fall again and yet not be afraid of falling?

It is very true. But even a traitor may mend. I have known one who did.

My good Horse," said the Hermit, who had approached them unnoticed because his bare feet made so little noise on that sweet, dewy grass. "My good Horse, you've lost nothing but your self-conceit. No, no, cousin. Don't put back your ears and shake your mane at me. If you are really so humbled as you sounded a minute ago, you must learn to listen to sense. You're not quite the great Horse you had come to think, from living among poor dumb horses. Of course you were braver and cleverer than them. You could hardly help being that. It doesn't follow that you'll be anyone very special in Narnia. But as long as you know you're nobody very special, you'll be a very decent sort of Horse, on the whole, and taking one thing with another.

One of the drawbacks about adventures is that when you come to the most beautiful places you are often too anxious and hurried to appreciate them.

Onward and Upward! To Narnia and the North!

People who know a lot of the same things can hardly help talking about them.

Please,' she said, 'You're so beautiful. You may eat me if you like. I'd rather be eaten by you than fed by anyone else.

See the bear in his own den before you judge of his conditions.

Shasta estaba terriblemente asustado, pero de repente le pasó por la cabeza una frase: "Si huyes de esto, huirás de todas las batallas que tengas que librar en tu vida. Es ahora o nunca".

The bolt of Tash falls from above!'
'Does it ever get caught on a hook halfway?

The harder you tried not to think, the more you thought.

Then Hwin, though shaking all over, gave a strange little neigh and trotted across to the Lion.

"Please," she said, "you're so beautiful. You may eat me if you like. I'd sooner be eaten by you than fed by anyone else.

When things go wrong, you'll find they usually go on getting worse for some time; but when things once start going right they often go on getting better and better.

Who are you?” asked Shasta.

“Myself,” said the Voice, very deep and low so that the earth shook: and again “Myself,” loud and clear and gay: and then the third time “Myself,” whispered so softly you could hardly hear it, and yet it seemed to come from all around you as if the leaves rustled with it.

Who are you?'
One who has waited long for you to speak.

Your Majesty would have a perfect right to strike off his head," said Peridan. "Such an assault as he made puts him on a level with assassins."
"It is very true," said Edmund. "But even a traitor may mend. I have known one that did." And he looked very thoughtful.